Abstract # 3193 Poster # 100:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


KETAMINE RECOVERY TIME PREDICTS ALCOHOL INTAKE IN GROUP-HOUSED ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

A. Sorenson1, B. S. Padro1, J. P. Capitanio2 and J. D. Higley1
1Brigham Young University, Department of Psychology, Provo, Utah 84602, USA, 2University of California Davis, California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA, 95616
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Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in animal research and human clinical cases. Its neurological profile is similar to alcohol, with both acting on NMDA receptors. Ketamine also shows cross-tolerance with alcohol. For this study we looked at the change in ketamine recovery time (time to sit up) between an initial dose and the average of a second and third dose and its relationship to alcohol consumption. Subjects were 15 adolescent male rhesus macaques. Each was exposed to ketamine three times prior to introduction to alcohol. Two weeks later they were allowed to consume a palatable alcohol solution two hours a day, five days a week for five weeks. When controlling for weight and the amount of ketamine given, a correlation was found between the change in ketamine recovery time and alcohol consumption. Change in ketamine recovery time was significantly correlated with all five weeks of alcohol intake (r=.763, .717, .710, p<.05, n=15; r=.929, .889, p<.01, n=11), with larger changes in recovery time showing a positive correlation with alcohol intake. This correlation indicates that the change in tolerance build up after repeated experiences with ketamine is predictive of alcohol consumption, and suggests that the change in tolerance after repeated exposure to NMDA agents can be used as a measure of susceptibility to alcoholism.