Abstract # 112:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 18, 2011 09:15 AM-09:30 AM: Session 16 (Salon F (Sixth Floor)) Oral Presentation


ALPHA MALE TENURES AND MALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN WILD WHITE-FACED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS, C. CAPUCINUS, AT LOMAS BARBUDAL, COSTA RICA

S. E. Perry1,2, I. Godoy1,2 and W. Lammers2
1University of California-Los Angeles, Anthropology Department & Behavior, Evolution and Culture Program, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, 2Lomas Barbudal Monkey Project, Bagaces, GTE, Costa Rica
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In species exhibiting high reproductive skew, the length of alpha male tenures can greatly impact the genetic structure of groups. In the Lomas Barbudal Monkey Project data set (up to 20 years of data on 11 groups), 42 males held the alpha position, each contributing 1-12 alpha male tenures. The mean alpha male tenure length was 0.96 years (ranging from 1 day to at least 17 years, N=97 tenures). About 36% of alpha tenures last <1 week, and 78% last <1 year. However, over 5% last >6 years. In 61% of cases, males became alpha male by challenging the alpha of their resident group, and in 24% of cases, males became alpha by invading neighboring groups. In 5-6 cases, challengers killed the alpha male. In 9% of cases, males “inherited” their group from the current alpha male when he died or disappeared or the group fissioned. Only 27 of 88 adult males available as potential sires sired the 184 offspring for which we know paternity. The alpha male sired 74% of all offspring (92% of offspring produced by unrelated females, and 6% of offspring conceived by his female descendants). Long tenures result in higher numbers of full sibling and paternal half sibling dyads than are typical of primate societies. Support: NSF (SBR-9870429, 0613226 & 6848360), Leakey, NGS, MPI ,& Wenner-Gren.