Abstract # 143:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 03:05 PM-03:35 PM: Session 19 (Salon F (Sixth Floor)) Oral Presentation


INFANT GENETICS AND MATERNAL VARIANCE FOR SURVIVORSHIP OF RHESUS MACAQUE (MACACA MULATTA) OFFSPRING

G. E. Blomquist
University of Missouri , Department of Anthropology , Columbia MO 65211-1440 , MO, USA
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The genetics of primate life histories are poorly understood, but quantitative genetic patterns in other mammals suggest variation early in life should be strongly affected by the environment provided by mothers rather than offspring genes. Previous research using demographic records for the semi-free ranging rhesus macaques on Cayo Santiago identified a modest additive genetic component in female survival to reproductive age (h2=0.27±0.10). This result is disassembled here with generalized linear mixed model and survival analytic extensions of complex pedigree quantitative genetic techniques to explore variance components for infant and juvenile survival rates across pre-reproductive ages. Using a larger set of records (max. n=7003), these new results implicate a large maternal variance component early in life with infant genes playing a minimal role, but this pattern largely reverses with age as maternal effects “burn off.”