Abstract # 4206 Poster # 150:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


RECIPROCAL GROOMING AND TIME MATCHING IN A CAPTIVE GROUP OF SULAWESI BLACK CRESTED MACAQUES (MACACA NIGRA)

M. E. Tyrrell1 and C. M. Berman1,2
1University at Buffalo SUNY, Graduate Program in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior, Buffalo, NY 14120, USA, 2Department of Anthropology, University at Buffalo SUNY, Buffalo, NY 14120, USA
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     Biological markets theory predicts that species with relaxed dominance styles, such as Macaca nigra, should limit grooming reciprocation to immediate, short term exchanges and that groomers should match the duration of grooming they have just received. This study examined these predictions for six captive M. nigra females at the Buffalo Zoo. We recorded durations of grooming episodes between specific groomers and receivers using all occurrence sampling from June – December 2010 (n= 2186 grooming episodes in 110 observation hours). Partial rowwise matrix correlations indicated that the macaques groom reciprocally over several minutes (range of tau=0.423-.0488, p<0.034), but not over longer periods of time (range of tau=-0.008-0.067, p>0.345). However, linear regression models showed no evidence that durations grooming received predicted durations of grooming given back (F(6,343)=0.423, p=0.516), indicating that grooming episodes are not time-matched. The absence of long term reciprocal grooming may be due to limited cognitive abilities to keep track of grooming given and received, or it may be that precise or “calculated reciprocity” is not important for maintaining grooming relationships. Instead of assuming that biological market forces determine grooming patterns, grooming reciprocity may be influenced by social interactions among individuals and mediated by “emotional bookkeeping”, i.e., a decision-making process based on the general emotional reaction an individual has to another.