Abstract # 95:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: Session 13 (3rd Floor All Space) Oral Presentation


ADAPTIVE EVOLUTION OF PRIMATE MANDIBLES ACROSS TAXA: DIET AND FEEDING ECOLOGY SHAPES THE JAW.

D. L. Arranaga, D. Wagner and S. Wagner
Central Washington University, 501 N Kittitas St. #1, Ellensburg, WA 98926, USA
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     Recent investigations into the functional link between diet and form have focused on rigorous quantitative methods for describing shape using geometric morphometrics. We used geometric morphometric analysis to investigate primate mandibular shape with respect to four dietary categories: frugivores, folivores, ripe fruit specialists and the cooked food specialist. Statistical shape analysis was used to investigate differences in jaw morphology in relation to dietary composition and feeding ecology for haplorhines (monkeys and apes) with respect to phylogeny. Twenty-eight landmark coordinates on 178 haplorhine mandibles of nine different taxa were collected using a 3D Microscribe. Coordinates were superimposed using procrustes analysis and then analyzed using MorphoJ software analysis package. Landmark coordinate values were analyzed using two sets. The first set (MAND) utilized all 28 landmarks to represent the overall shape of the mandible, whereas the second set (Corp and Symph) used only landmark coordinates found along the corpus and symphysis. Canonical variate analysis showed significant variation between frugivores, folivores and cook food specialists with less variation between ripe fruit specialists and frugivores in both data sets (with all Mahalanobis distances significant at p<0.01). There was also evidence for significant differences in diet categories based on ANOVA in both data sets (F=6.90 and p<0.0002, F=3.83 and p<0.0110 respectively). In addition, different taxa show convergence in jaw morphology based on diet irrespective of phylogeny.