Abstract # 151:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


BEHAVIORAL INHIBITION CHARACTERIZED IN INFANCY PREDICTS SOCIAL AND ANXIOUS BEHAVIOR IN ONE-YEAR-OLD RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

K. Chun1,2,3 and J. P. Capitanio1,2,3
1University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3Department of Psychology
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     Behavioral inhibition (BI) in humans is characterized by shyness and emotional reserve in novel situations, and in rhesus monkeys by vigilant behavior and decreased vocalizations. BI has been associated with altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and decreased social functioning and anxiety later in life. In the present study, we studied one-year-old rhesus monkeys in two situations, to determine whether BI, assessed in infancy, influenced behavioral expression. Monkeys from eight 0.19-hectare corrals at the California National Primate Research Center experienced a 25-hr BioBehavioral Assessment at 3-4-months of age involving separation from mother and relocation to a novel environment. BI was defined using factor-analyzed scales reflecting behavioral responsiveness and temperament and measures of plasma cortisol; specifically BI was characterized as high vigilance, low emotionality, and blunted cortisol response. At a mean age of 1.25-years, 52 animals (26 of which were inhibited) were observed in their natal corrals (eight 10-min-focal observations) and in an individual cage following brief relocation (one 5-min-focal). In the natal-cage, inhibited animals spent less time in proximity (p=0.015) and grooming (p=0.016) with mother, and more time in a non-social state (p=0.017). In the relocation-cage, inhibited animals had higher frequencies of scratching (p=0.051) and position changes (p=0.009). These results suggest that BI characterized during infancy is related to decreased social functioning and increased anxious behavior a year later, emphasizing the continuity of BI in rhesus monkeys.