Abstract # 132:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS: EARLY IRON DEFICIENCY AND MAOA POLYMORPHISMS INFLUENCE THE BEHAVIOR OF YOUNG RHESUS MONKEYS

M. S. Golub1,2 and C. E. Hogrefe1
1BMB/CNPRC/UCDavis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95815, USA, 2Environmental Toxicology Department, UCDavis
line
     Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) polymorphisms resulting in high and low transcription rates interact with early adverse environmental factors to alter risk for social conduct disorders and psychopathology in humans. This study examines possible interaction of nutritional deficiency of iron, commonly seen during fetal and infant development, with MAOA polymorphisms in influencing infant and juvenile behavior. Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) dams were fed an iron deficient diet (10 ppm, ID) or an iron sufficient diet (100 ppm, IS) during gestation. Male offspring (10/group) were tested behaviorally from infancy to 2 years of age. Each group contained animals with both low-MAOA activity genetic polymorphism and high-MAOA activity polymorphisms. There were no effects on growth and infants were not anemic after birth. The test battery included diurnal activity, response to maternal separation and novel experiences, problem solving, and reward efficacy. Genotype (MAOA) and diet (ID) effects were seen on many tests, but MAOA*ID interactions were the most prominent findings. Sensitive tests included sleep patterns, cortisol responses to maternal separation, behavioral response to human intruder, reward preference and reward devaluation. Cognitive and impulsivity testing were also demonstrated MAOA*ID. Two interaction patterns emerged, one suggesting unique sensitivity of the low- or hi-MAOA infants to ID, and one suggesting a different direction of response to ID depending on MAOA genotype. Supported by NIH/NICHD P01 HD039386 Sub002.