Abstract # 4249 Poster # 72:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 21, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


INFANT TEMPERAMENT PREDICTS RHESUS MONKEYS’ (MACACA MULATTA) RESPONSE TO ROUTINE HUSBANDRY PROCEDURES 1-10 YEARS LATER

B. S. Padro1, T. A. Weinstein2 and J. P. Capitanio2
1Brigham Young University, 1 University Hill, Provo, Utah 84602, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave Davis, CA 95616
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     We investigated whether biobehavioral organization measured during infancy predicted rhesus monkeys’ response to daily husbandry procedures when observed years later. We assessed 193 monkeys (mean age = 7.1 years) housed in standard laboratory cages at the California National Primate Research Center. Every morning a technician hosed each animal’s living cage floor with water and a sanitizer solution. We classified subjects’ response to this procedure as reflecting avoidance (moving away from the hose, clinging to the back of the cage, and/or fear grimacing) or no response. Subjects had participated in a 25-hour BioBehavioral Assessment (BBA) at age 3-4 months. We used logistic regression to determine whether the following variables predicted response to hosing: age, sex, length of time in current living cage, and eight BBA-derived temperament and responsiveness scores. Entering these variables into the regression equation significantly improved the model, X2(11)=39.28, p<.001:, animals that scored higher in Day 1 Emotionality (p<.05) and lower in Vigilance (p<.01) were most likely to display an avoidance response to hosing. Males, as well as younger animals, were also more likely to avoid the hose compared to females and older animals (both p<.01). These results demonstrate that monkeys who had displayed an emotionally reactive and tense response style during infancy were more likely to respond fearfully to a routine husbandry procedure when observed years after the original assessment.