Abstract # 135:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


MATRILINEAL INFLUENCES ON AGE AT FIRST PARTURITION AND SUBSEQUENT INTERBIRTH INTERVALS FOR FEMALE RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA)

E. L. Zucker1, C. M. Escabi Ruiz2, M. Pabon2, E. Maldonado2 and J. Gonzalez-Martinez2
1Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA, 2Caribbean Primate Research Center, University of Puerto Rico
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     Social factors can mediate reproductive physiology, reproductive outcomes, and lifetime reproductive success. Differences in age at first parturition and subsequent interbirth intervals, as a function of matriline and matriline rank, were assessed for Group M female rhesus monkeys at the Sabana Seca Field Station (Caribbean Primate Research Center) using colony records (1972-2011). Matrilineal ranks were based on agonistic outcomes and historical information; three matrilines originated on Cayo Santiago and one began upon relocation to Sabana Seca. Females in the top-ranking matriline were expected to have earlier first births and shorter subsequent interbirth intervals. Overall, the mean age at first parturition was 4.54 years (sd=1.22; N=308), and matriline differences approached significance [ANOVA; p = .076]; females in the top-ranking matriline and the newest matriline had first infants earlier (4.24 and 4.21 years, respectively). The mean interval to second parturitions was 1.50 years (sd=0.84; N=250), with significantly shorter intervals [t-test; p = .001] following non-surviving first infants (1.13 years) than following surviving first infants (1.58 years); no matriline differences existed for second births. For females producing three or more infants, subsequent interbirth intervals averaged 1.45 years (sd=0.75; N=791), with significantly shorter intervals (mean=1.33) for the top-ranking matriline [ANOVA; p = .039]. Thus, differences in matriline membership and rank can influence rate of reproduction and reproductive success, and are particularly evident for females producing three or more infants.