Abstract # 43:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 21, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


A NEW ANALYSIS OF BOOM CALL VARIATION AMONG POPULATIONS OF MONA MONKEYS (CERCOPITHECUS MONA) IN GRENADA, BENIN AND CAMEROON

M. Patiño1, K. Werling1, K. Worsham1, R. Matsuda Goodwin2, M. E. Glenn1,3 and M. Ramsier1,3
1Humboldt State University, Humboldt Center for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Arcata, CA 95521, USA, 2Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Fordham University, New York, 3Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation, Grenada, West Indies
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     Examining intraspecific variation in acoustic parameters of the boom vocalization emitted by male guenons is an important step toward understanding the social and ecological functions of the call. We previously reported significant intraspecific variation in the booms of Cercopithecus mona populations in Benin and Grenada. Here, we compare the booms from an additional population in Cameroon that occupies denser and wetter forests with more sympatric primate species. Recordings were made with Sennheiser shotgun or unidirectional microphones and a Nagra III or DAT tape recorder, and analyzed within Raven Pro v.1.4. The booms of the three populations varied, with Grenada averaging the most narrow bandwidth (145-215 Hz) and shortest duration (90 ms) (n=16). Cameroon booms (n=19) were distinguished from both Grenada and Benin booms (n=16) in having a broader average bandwidth (97-389 Hz) and longer duration (144 ms). Interestingly, the bandwidth of mona booms from Cameroon closely resembles the booms of sympatric Cercopithecus pogonias; however, the latter emits only single booms, whereas monas tend to double boom. We speculate that the boom calls of Grenada monas may be affected by genetic drift or ecological release, and that the similarities between C. mona and C. pogonias booms in Cameroon may be partially explained by similar acoustic environmental pressures or by the benefits of interspecies communication in two species that are known to hybridize.