Abstract # 153:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


SOCIAL AND HORMONAL EFFECTS OF BACHELOR MALE HOUSING IN CAPTIVE COPPERY TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

C. A. Almeida1, N. Maninger1, S. P. Mendoza1,2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Psychology Department, University of California, Davis, CA
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     Titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) live in nuclear family groups, and the father becomes the primary attachment figure for his offspring. For management reasons, it is sometimes necessary to remove young, unrelated males from their families and attempt to house them together. The current study examines the frequencies of affiliative interactions between sub-adult male titis housed together in pairs (bachelor groups, n = 6 males), and compares them to affiliative interactions in age-matched male titis still in their nuclear family (natal males, n = 7). Data were collected as scan samples, at approximately two hour intervals (total = 797 scans), and analyzed as a proportion of total scans. Natal males spent a higher proportion of scans tail-twining (F = 4.84, p = 0.028), in contact (F = 31.69, p < 0.0001), and in proximity (F = 7.98, p = 0.005) to other group members than bachelor males. However, when comparing the proportions of time spent in affiliative behavior between bachelor males and their cage-mate compared to natal males and their fathers, the groups were not statistically different. Thus, it is possible that the higher frequencies of affiliative behavior by natal males are a result primarily of larger group size and thus higher social interaction opportunities. Levels of urinary cortisol were also measured in this study. Funding: NIH HD053555, RR00169, and the Good Nature Institute.