Abstract # 4279 Event # 11:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 21, 2012 02:45 PM-03:00 PM: Session 3 (Magnolia) Oral Presentation


COOPERATIVE DADS AND COMPETITIVE MOMS: EVOLUTIONARY ANALYSIS OF COOPERATIVE BREEDING IN SAGUINUS TAMARINS

S. L. Diaz-Munoz
University of California, Berkeley, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and Department of Integrative Biology,, Berkeley, CA 94720-3160, USA
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     Callitrichines are arguably the only cooperative breeders among non-human primates, but are understudied despite their vast potential to contribute to the understanding of the evolution of cooperative behavior. Saguinus tamarins have a complex breeding system where helping is extensive and multiple individuals often delay reproduction within a single group. The indirect (kin selected) and direct fitness (direct reproduction) benefits hypotheses were examined to explain cooperative parental care. Genetic and demographic data (38 captures, ca. 1,000 hrs field observations) from a field study of Geoffroy's tamarins (S. geoffroyi) in Panama [N = 6 groups, 36 individuals] was analyzed from an inclusive fitness, individual-based perspective. Data were collected on a multi-year time scale (2-3 breeding seasons per group) to examine paternity and relatedness over longer timescales than previous studies. Analyses of microsatellite genotypes (8 loci) revealed that male co-breeders are significantly more related [r=0.44, t(178) = -2.321, p = 0.021] than mean population relatedness and can share reproduction over multi-year time scales. Subordinate females are also more related than mean population relatedness [r=0.26, t(5) = 3.4589, p = 0.0196], but rarely share reproduction waiting instead for reproductive vacancies. The indirect and direct fitness benefits hypotheses were supported, but the relative importance of these benefits varied according to an individual's sex and life-history stage, suggesting this should taken into account in future studies of Callitrichine cooperative breeding.