Abstract # 4290 Poster # 65:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 21, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


ADRENAL AND GONADAL HORMONES ASSOCIATED WITH THE TIME OF EJECTION FROM NATAL GROUP IN CAPTIVE MALE TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

P. Goodell1, N. Maninger1, S. P. Mendoza1,2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, One Shields Ave, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Psychology Department, University of California, Davis, 95616
line
     Titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) live in nuclear family groups and little is known about the hormonal correlates associated with dispersal. In captivity, they are either ejected from their natal groups by family members (removed due to aggression) or are removed for colony management/research purposes. The goal of the current project was to examine whether there were gonadal and adrenal hormone changes in males two months before ejection (n=8), and also between same-age control males who remained in their natal groups (n=7). Urine samples were collected non-invasively from males in their home cages between 0600-0700h. Urinary cortisol and total testosterone were measured using commercial radioimmunoassay kits validated for titi monkeys. Preliminary mixed-model analyses revealed that prior to ejection, males who were about to be ejected had higher urinary cortisol concentrations than age-matched control males who remained in their natal groups (p<0.0001). In contrast to cortisol, males who were about to be ejected had lower levels of testosterone than age-matched control males (p=0.048). The cortisol data fit with the prediction that animals experiencing more social stress prior to ejection would have higher cortisol concentrations. In contrast to the prediction that males who got ejected earlier would show increased reproductive activity (or more testosterone-related aggression), ejected males showed lower testosterone prior to ejection. Funding: President’s Undergraduate Fellowship, NIH HD053555 and RR00169, and the Good Nature Institute.