Abstract # 4291 Poster # 140:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


ASSESSING VARIATION IN INFANT RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA): A BIOBEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT THE CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRIMATE RESEARCH CENTER

J. Capitanio1, L. Calonder1, K. Chun1, L. Del Rosso1, K. Hinde1,2, E. Kinnally1,3, W. Mason1, S. Mendoza1, E. Sullivan1, J. Vandeleest1 and T. Weinstein1
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Harvard University, 3Columbia University
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Darwin’s recognition of the importance of phenotypic variation in biology has generally not been appreciated by scientists, who tend to want to minimize or eliminate variation. Understanding variation in biobehavioral organization (comprising temperament, coping, and physiological organization) can have important implications for colony management and research studies. At CNPRC, we have developed a unique resource, an assessment program that quantifies variation in biobehavioral organization in 3-4 month old rhesus monkeys. Data are made available to staff and qualified scientists for management and research purposes. In this presentation, we describe this program, provide examples of variation that we have recorded, and present results demonstrating use of this resource: Available milk energy produced by the mother when the infant was a month old is related to a Confident temperament (Regression, p=0.003); Behaviorally inhibited monkeys have decreased lung function (a marker of asthma) (ANOVA, p=0.031); The more similar infants’ and their friends’ temperament scores, the more likely they were to remain friends through age two (Logistic Regression, p<0.05); Having a Gentle or Nervous temperament is a risk factor for the development of motor stereotypy for indoor-, but not outdoor-reared animals years later (Logistic Regression, p <0.05); Only infants with the high-activity, “low-risk” alleles of the rhMAOA-LPR or rh5-HTTLPR genes showed significant associations in temperament factor scores with those of their mothers (Canonical Correlation, p< .001).