Abstract # 108:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 12:30 PM-12:45 PM: Session 16 (3rd Floor All Space) Oral Presentation


VARIATION IN LIQUID FOOD INTAKE PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH OBESITY DEVELOPMENT IN COMMON MARMOSETS: LICK SIZE

S. D. Tardif1, C. N. Ross1 and M. L. Power2
1Barshop Institute for Longevity & Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA, 2American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists
line
     Because marmosets are adapted to consume a large percentage of their diet via licking exudates, we adapted a rodent lickometer system to measure meal structure and patterning in this species and applied this methodology to two separate studies of obesity development: obesity during infancy and adolescence; and development of diet-induced obesity in adults. While most of the standard meal and inter-meal variables used in rodent studies did not differ between obesity-prone and obesity-resistant marmosets, one set of unusual phenotypes was found to differentiate the two groups in both studies. The number of licks per day and licks per meal were lower in obesity-prone youngsters (68-72% of obesity-resistant average) and adults (57% of obesity-resistant average). Because the groups did not differ in the total amount of liquid diet consumed per trial, the grams per lick were higher in obesity-prone youngsters (127-136% of obesity-resistant average) and adults (170% of obesity-resistant average). The consistency of these findings suggest that amount of intake per lick will differentiate obesity-prone and obesity-resistant marmoset monkeys. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this variable may be related to other behavioral phenotypes – such as anxiety and overall activity – and future studies will explore these relationships as well as whether lick size in marmosets is equivalent to bite size in either marmosets or humans.