Abstract # 4311 Poster # 58:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 21, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


MONITORING COMPATIBILITY OF SOCIALLY-HOUSED LABORATORY MACACA MULATTA AND ERYTHROCEBUS PATAS: DEVELOPING A BASELINE QUANTITY OF PROXIMITY

A. M. West1,2,3, M. C. Carey1,2,3, A. Lozano1, S. Samuels3, W. L. Wagner1 and J. M. Erwin4
1BIOQUAL, Inc., Department of Primate Psychology, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA, 2BIOQUAL Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Research Boulevard., Rockville, MD, USA, 3BIOQUAL, Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD, USA, 4VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA
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     Full-contact social housing is regarded as the most effective means of ensuring the psychological well-being of laboratory primates; but assessment and monitoring of compatibility is essential for well-being to be maintained. The results reported here are from an NIH contract research facility that maintains a policy of housing primates socially, except in IACUC- approved or veterinary ordered cases. In this study, we observed rhesus macaques (14 adults, 4 juveniles) and patas monkeys (6 adults, 7 juveniles, 1 infant ) housed in enclosures designed to promote social housing. Eight social units were of mixed gender, while ten were of the same gender (3 females, 7 males). Eight focal observational samples of 3-min were conducted for each group (432-min total). Duration of animal location was recorded as: different cages (apart), the same cage (proximity), or within arm’s length (close proximity). The mean times spent in proximity and close proximity were 104 seconds/session (rhesus) and 14 seconds/session (patas). No significant differences in these patterns were found to be associated with age or sex within species (Mann Whitney, p>0.05). When comparing species, rhesus spent a significantly greater amount of time in proximity and close proximity (T-test; p<.0001). Rhesus pairs who were together 100-66% of the time showed an increased stereotypy rate (Tukey STD, p<0.01) when compared to pairs who were together 33-66% or 0-33% of the time.