Abstract # 4352 Event # 104:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 12:15 PM-12:30 PM: Session 15 (Camellia ) Oral Presentation


RELATION OF FOOD INTAKE BEHAVIORS AND OBESITY DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG COMMON MARMOSET MONKEYS (CALLITHRIX JACCHUS)

C. N. Ross1, M. L. Power2,3 and S. D. Tardif1
1University of Texas Health Science Center, Barshop Institute for Longevity & Aging, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207, USA, 2American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 3Nutrition Laboratory Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
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     Prevalence of childhood obesity is a growing concern in the world with reported rates increasing annually. We studied the growth of 33 infant marmosets from birth to 12 months of age. Marmosets are considered weaned at 3 months of age, in early childhood at 6 months, and adolescence at 12 months. We evaluated feeding behaviors throughout development using behavioral observations (age: 14-45 days), solid food intake trials (age: 6, 12 months), and liquid food intake trials using a lickometer (age: 3, 6, 12 months). Infants were also assessed at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months for body composition using QMR. The first day the infants were noted to eat solid food had a significant linear relationship with body fat composition both at 6 months (R = 0.36, p=0.04) and 12 months (R = 0.43, p=0.02). Consumption of high fat liquid diet at 6 months was significantly related to body fat at 6 months (R = 0.52, p=0.00). In the liquid feeding trials at 6 months grams consumed per lick of the lickometer was significantly predictive of the body fat of infants at 12 months of age (R=0.43, p=0.02). This study has revealed a number of relationships between early infant feeding behaviors including the time of weaning, food preference, eating style, and overall consumption that are significantly related to body composition and the development of obesity.