Abstract # 162:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 10:45 AM-11:00 AM: Session 11 (Camellia ) Oral Presentation


BRIEF REPORT ON MEAT-EATING IN THE IYEMA BONOBO COMMUNITY; LOMAKO FOREST, DRCONGO

A. K. Cobden
Emory University, Anthropology Department, 1557 Dickey Dr., Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
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     Both chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) are known to hunt and consume meat of other mammals. Sharing of meat in chimpanzees has been tied to male bonding and mating efforts, while in bonobos a lack of pronounced hunting and a relatively higher rate of meat-sharing between females has been used to contextualize a lack of male bonding. In spite of decades of research, little is known about meat-eating and hunting in wild bonobos. Between June 2010 and June 2011, we collected 712 fresh fecal samples from beneath night nests of the Iyema bonobo study community (Lomako Forest, Democratic Republic of Congo). Samples were washed and analyzed for content. Animal remains, including different species of small antelope, a tree hyrax and an unidentified bird were found on 6 separate occasions in 14 samples; we found no traces for consumption of monkeys in this community. The consumption of meat was not directly linked to periods of fruit scarcity, presence of ketones in urine, nor was it evenly distributed across members of nesting parties. The sporadic nature of these events and the prevalence of nocturnal species consumed is concurrent with evidence from other sites, illustrating that hunting in bonobos is probably more closely tied to opportunism than ecological pressure. Keywords:Bonobos, Lomako, Meat-Eating