Abstract # 139:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2012 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Gardenia) Poster Presentation


DOMINANCE HIERARCHY POSITION INFLUENCES RING-TAILED LEMUR (LEMUR CATTA) FEEDING TIME AT BERENTY RESERVE, MADAGASCAR

A. Niemeyer, S. Peterson, A. Kuykendall and A. Mertl-Millhollen
Portland State University, Department of Anthropology, Portland, Oregon 97201, USA
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     Position in the ring-tailed lemur dominance hierarchy may determine an individual’s opportunity to feed. We predicted that agonistic displacement interactions would reduce feeding patch utilization by subordinate individuals. In June/July2010, we collected 17 days of 5-minute time samples using two simultaneous methods: focal animal and group scan. We observed a five-member troop, four females and one male. Focal data were collected by taking both time point samples and continuous ad libitum data. For group scan time samples, we noted the behavior exhibited by a majority of the troop. If there was feeding by any troop member, feeding was the recorded activity, and a feeding patch number was recorded. Each new feeding location had a new patch number. By comparing focal and group scan data we determined the proportion of patches at which each individual fed. Overall, the troop fed in 300 patches (median=16/day). We observed 73 agonistic displacements. The number of losses by an individual inversely correlated with the percent of patches fed in by that individual (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient rs=1, N=5, P=.01). Patches utilized for three or fewer scans, with presumably fewer resources, accounted for 52% of total patches/day. Their use displayed the same correlation with dominance rank but with an even greater disparity between dominant and subordinate individuals, suggesting that higher ranking individuals have preferential feeding opportunity in less resource-abundant patches.