Abstract # 4431 Event # 8:

Scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2013 10:15 AM-10:30 AM: (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Symposium


A SAKI SAGA: DYNAMIC AND DISRUPTIVE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PITHECIA AEQUATORIALIS PAIR-MATES IN EASTERN ECUADOR

A. Porter1, M. Grote1, L. Isbell1, E. Fernandez-Duque2 and A. Di Fiore3
1Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Department of Anthropology, University of Texas, Austin, TX, 78712
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     Sakis have been reported to live in socially monogamous groups, as well as in groups containing >1 adult member of each sex. As part of a long-term study, we documented the integration of a second adult male into a habituated group of sakis formed by an adult male, an adult female, and their putative subadult daughter. We describe spatial and social relationships among these group members before and during the integration of the second male (452 hrs focal data). We also compare the resident male’s nearest neighbor data in the month preceding and following the integration of the second male to baseline data collected earlier. Our data show clear differences in the spatial arrangements of individuals in these different time periods, especially those of the long-term resident male with his pair-mate and putative daughter. Before the second male’s arrival, the resident male spent significantly more time in proximity to his pair-mate than to his putative daughter. However, he spent significantly more time near his putative daughter than his pair-mate both immediately before and after the integration of the second male. Interestingly, three months after the integration, the two males dispersed from the group together, leaving the females and a new infant behind. Our observations suggest that sakis may have a more flexible social system than other pair-living primates, such as titis and owl monkeys.