Abstract # 74:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES TO AN ACUTE STRESSOR DECREASE ACROSS DEVELOPMENT AND ARE DYNAMICALLY RELATED TO HPA ACTIVITY IN MARMOSETS

J. H. Taylor1,2 and J. A. French1,2
1University of Nebraska - Omaha, 6001 Dodge Street, Allwine Hall 524, O, N 68182, USA, 2Callitrichid Research Center
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     Psychosocial stressors elicit both affective and neuroendocrine responses. Each of these systems is regulated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release, but the degree to which these two systems are co-activated in response to stressors is unclear. Furthermore, developmental changes in the behavioral stressor response may not correspond to developmental changes in the endocrine component of the stressor response. This study examined the behavior-cortisol relationship in response to a stressor in young marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi), as well as developmental changes in behavioral responding. Young monkeys were isolated for 8h at 6 (N=47), 12 (N=47), and 18 (N=32) months. We found that at 6 months, greater phee calling was correlated with greater baseline cortisol (r(47)=.29, p=.045) and greater alarm calling was correlated with greater cortisol reactivity (r(47)=.32, p=.027). At 18 months, higher cage manipulations and locomotion were correlated with poorer 24-hour cortisol recovery (r(30)=.40, p=.030; r(30)=.49, p=.006). Across development, we found that overall rates of phee calling (chi-square(2,N=32)=13.71, p=.001), alarm calling (chi-square(2,N=32)=6.39, p=.041), and locomotion (chi-square(2,N=32)=7.31, p=.026) decreased, while cage manipulations (chi-square(2,N=32) = 6.31, p=.043) increased. We concluded that while the behavioral and endocrine (French et al, 2012) systems follow a similar developmental trajectory, each maintains a level of independence. Given the lack of consistent co-activation of these systems, future research should examine the developmental mechanisms that explain this divergence. Supported by NIH (HD42882).