Abstract # 143:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 03:20 PM-03:35 PM: Session 20 (San Geronimo Ballroom C) Oral Presentation


THE ROLE OF ADULT SOCIAL BONDS AND THE OPIOID SYSTEM ON EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY IN THE TITI MONKEY (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

B. J. Ragen1,2, S. P. Mendoza2, N. Maninger2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA, 95616, USA
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     Social bonds influence emotions in primates. Much of this research has been performed with infant-mother bonds and affiliative relationships among adults. Despite these studies, relatively little is known about how adult attachments can influence emotional reactivity as well as the physiological substrates that underlie these emotions. The titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) is one of the few monogamous primates, and they provide an excellent animal model to explore how attachment, particularly adult attachment, can alter emotional reactivity and its physiological correlates. This presentation will address the similarities and differences in affiliative and arousal behaviors between different types of social bonds (adult-adult vs. infant-parent). Additionally, it will address how the absence of an attachment figure can result in alterations in emotional reactivity (Ragen et al., 2012). Neurobiological systems of emotions, such as the opioid system, will also be addressed since they have been found to be involved in attachment processes. Manipulation of the opioid system, particularly the mu and kappa opioid receptors, can interact with the presence of an adult pair-mate and alter negative affect and related physiology. The presence of a pair-mate is able to buffer the negative effects of opioid blockade, and kappa antagonists can attenuate the behavioral distress that titi monkeys exhibit upon involuntary separation from their pair-mate. This research gives greater insight into how attachment and opioids can regulate emotions, behavior, and physiology.