Abstract # 10:

Scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2013 10:45 AM-11:00 AM: (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Symposium


MONOGAMY, PAIRBONDING AND BIPARENTAL CARE IN WILD OWL MONKEYS (AOTUS AZARAE) OF ARGENTINA

E. Fernandez-Duque1,2
1431 University Museum, 3260 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA, 2CECOAL-Conicet
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     I will present a synthesis of the research conducted within the Owl Monkey Project of Argentina to evaluate two non-exclusive hypotheses that explain the maintenance of social monogamy. To evaluate the hypothesis that females are distributed in space matching the availability of food present in areas that cannot support more than one female, we investigated forest structure, composition and food availability in 4 territories (n=7881 trees), their relationship to reproductive output and female reproductive synchronicity (n= 4 females). To evaluate the role of mate-guarding, we examined adult replacements and the genetic relatedness of reproducing pairs and infants. There was variation among territories in size (6-11ha) and in the availability of fruits, flowers, leaves, and other edible vegetative parts, but no strong relationship between the quality of territories and reproductive output (Chi-square test, X2 = 1.387, df = 3, p = 0.71). Males (n=22) and females (n=25) were equally replaced by intruders through aggressive interactions (G-test with William's correction, G=0.32, df=1, p=0.57). We did not find any evidence of extra-pair paternity (n=35 infants, 17 pairs). If mate-guarding is a successful mechanism for maintaining monogamy, the resulting high paternity certainty can explain the intense paternal care observed in the species. An ongoing lab-field project will evaluate the hypothesis that paternal care may be maintained because of its positive effects on female reproductive costs.