Abstract # 4479 Event # 23:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 11:15 AM-11:30 AM: Session 2 (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Symposium


BIPARTITE ZYGOMA IN THE MIDFACIAL SKELETONS OF MACACA MULATTA FROM CAYO SANTIAGO AND BEYOND

Q. Wang
Mercer University School of Medicine, Division of Basic Medical Sciences, 1550 College Street, Macon, GA 31207, USA
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The midface is not only a crucial area dissipating stresses associated with feeding activities, but also an important element in facial aesthetics. Rarely, the zygoma in the lateral midface is transected by an extra suture, which gives the bone a bipartite morphology (incidence of 2.5-6.5% in human populations). It is hypothesized that the Bipartite Zygoma (BZ) condition would alter: [1] the overall morphology of the midface, and [2] the pattern of stress distribution in the face during mastication. In this study, the BZ condition was investigated using the skeletal collection derived from Cayo Santiago (CS) and CS-derived Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) populations in the Caribbean Primate Research Center, using morphometric analysis and Finite Element Analysis to examine its developmental and biomechanical consequences. Results demonstrated that: [1] overall BZ is smaller than normal zygoma, indicating hypostasis, and [2] the stresses incurred during dietary activities will be unduly high in the lower midface and the zygomatic arch, indicating disturbed stress flow. Thus the presence of the extra suture in BZ condition has an unfavorable impact on the growth and function of the midface. What factors have lead to this kind of unfavorable ontogeny of facial skeletons awaits further studies. Insights into this rare BZ condition may deepen our understanding of the craniofacial form and adaptation, and help to improve therapeutic philosophies in corrective and regenerative medicine.