Abstract # 37:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 03:15 PM-03:45 PM: Session 6 (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Oral Presentation


THE IMPACT OF A YELLOW FEVER OUTBREAK ON ALOUATTA CARAYA IN A FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPE IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

D. S. Freitas1 and J. C. Bicca-Marques2
1Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul 90040-060, USA, 2Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul
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     Epizootic infections have been reported in primates living in several regions of the world. An outbreak of sylvatic yellow fever (YF) resulted in the death of more than 2,000 howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya and Alouatta guariba clamitans) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, over a 6-month period from October 2008 to April 2009. To estimate the potential impact of the outbreak on the conservation status of A. caraya in the absence of census data prior to the outbreak, we compared population data from a region where there is no recent report of the disease (Alegrete; 56% occupancy=31 out of 55 fragments; survey: January-March 2010) with a region with confirmed deaths of YF (Bossoroca; 12% occupancy=10 out of 83 fragments; survey: June-November 2010). The size and structure of Bossoroca groups were similar to those of Alegrete and the groups mentioned in the literature, suggesting that there is no age-sex difference in the susceptibility to the YF virus and the selectivity by the vector mosquito. Data from local health authorities and farmers allowed to estimate recent rates of extinction of isolated populations: Alegrete=14%, Bossoroca=80%. The increase in the distance between the remaining howler monkey populations in Bossoroca may compromise gene flow, thereby reducing their long-term viability and the survival of the species in the region. Funding: Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq) and PAF/Conservation International.