Abstract # 205:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 22, 2013 11:45 AM-12:00 PM: Session 24 (Auditorium) Oral Presentation


PITHECIID BEHAVIOR AND ECOLOGY IN DISTURBED HABITATS: PAST TRENDS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS

S. A. Boyle
Rhodes College, Dept. of Biology, 2000 North Parkway, Memphis, TN 38112, USA
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     Pitheciids (Cacajao, Callicebus, Chiropotes, and Pithecia) have experienced habitat loss and fragmentation across their geographic range in South America. Some populations living in disturbed habitats live in smaller groups, travel shorter distances, and consume items that are not regularly found in the diets of populations living in more intact habitat; however, these patterns are not consistent across species. I used the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species to delineate the geographic range and conservation status of 43 pitheciid species, and then calculated the amount of habitat loss that has occurred for each species (total area: 6,247,459 km2). I georeferenced published studies and examined to what extent areas of intense habitat loss had been studied. Critically endangered and endangered species represented 20.1% of the pitheciid species, and were distributed across the pitheciid range. Population trends for the species were listed as decreasing (46.5%), stable (11.6%), and unknown (41.9%). Habitat loss was greatest for Callicebus (16.24% of geographic range), followed by Chiropotes (8.02 %), Pithecia (2.8 %), and Cacajao (1.07%). Most pitheciid studies addressing habitat loss and fragmentation have concentrated on population estimates, with limited data on behavioral and ecological changes. Increased data on the responses of pitheciid species to habitat loss and fragmentation are necessary in order to address pitheciid conservation in the future, especially in areas where there has been severe habitat loss.