Abstract # 4519 Poster # 182:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 21 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


THE USE OF CAMERA TRAPS TO STUDY A NOCTURNAL MONKEY (AOTUS SSP.)IN CAPTIVITY

S. Evans1,2
1DuMond Conservancy and Florida International University, 14805 SW 216St, Miami, Florida 33170, USA, 2Florida International University
line
     Remote photography and infra-red sensors are used in the sampling of wildlife populations worldwide, especially for cryptic or elusive species. However, the usefulness of camera traps in captivity has not been widely reported. The DuMond Conservancy maintains 22 social groups of nocturnal owl monkeys. We acquired camera traps with the intention of using them as a management tool to monitor the health and well-being of the monkeys. We soon realized that 30 sec video recording at 10 minute intervals yielded a lot of valuable behavioral information. Specifically, we discovered that the camera traps were regularly capturing behaviors e.g., grooming, that we considered to occur infrequently. Our social groups have been intensively studied for the past 10 years but we are re-assessing how well habituated the monkeys are to human observers. Furthermore, because the camera traps are attached to the wire mesh of the monkey enclosures and they have infra-red sensors, the images they produced allowed us to describe certain behaviors in greater detail and with more certainty. For example, we had described the cupping of the hand by males below the anogenital region of females but it was viewing camera trap footage that revealed that the females were dribbling a very small amount of urine onto the male’s hand.