Abstract # 4540 Poster # 56:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CONSTRUCTION NOISES AND VIBRATIONS ON CAPTIVE RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA)

C. A. Begnoche and M. A. Novak
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003-9271, USA
line
     The effects of irregular vibrations on rodents and livestock have been well documented, but little information about vibration effects is available in non-human primates. This study assessed the long-term impact of construction of 7 new buildings adjacent to an animal facility. Vibration was monitored in the facility by Acentech Systems throughout three phases: 9 weeks of preconstruction, 20 weeks of roof construction (placement of a sound-attenuating roof over the facility) and 20 weeks of dorm construction (7 buildings). Behavioral data were collected 4-5 days per week from 9-10 am on 9 subjects (3 males). Vibration levels doubled on average during the roof and dorm construction. We hypothesized that the increased vibration would cause an increase in anxiety (scratch and yawn) and stereotypic behavior. Instead, monkeys showed substantial behavioral suppression as revealed by repeated measures ANOVA. There was a significant decrease both in behavioral rate (number of times monkeys changed behavior; p=0.018) and in the range of species typical behaviors expressed (number of different behaviors; p= 0.004). This effect was most pronounced from the preconstruction to dorm construction period (Change: p=0.034, Range: p=0.015). Similar declines were observed in yawning and scratching. These data suggest that there may be a significant suppression in the behavioral activities of rhesus monkeys exposed to long periods of persistent construction noises and vibrations.