Abstract # 4543 Poster # 153:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 21 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


EXTREME AND MINIMAL RESPONSE TO EARLY SOCIAL STRESS IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA) PREDICTS THE RESPONSE TO SOCIAL CHALLENGE LATER IN LIFE

M. L. Schwandt1, S. J. Suomi2, J. D. Higley3 and C. S. Barr4
1NIAAA/LCTS, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, 10CRC/1-5330, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, 2NICHD/LCE, National Institutes of Health, 3Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, 4NIAAA/LNG, National Institutes of Health
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     In studying the response to stress in animals, a recent method of investigating individual differences has been developed whereby the focus is on extreme responses, both at the low end (minimal response, MR) and the high end (extreme response, ER) of the spectrum. We identified minimal and extreme responders to a social separation paradigm in infant rhesus macaques, and examined how those individuals responded to a social challenge later in life. ER subjects (n=6) were in the 90th percentile for cortisol response to the social separation, while MR subjects (n=8) were in the 10th percentile. Behavioral responses to the presence of an unfamiliar conspecific (the “Intruder Challenge”) were observed several years later for these ER and MR subjects, as well as for a set of age and sex matched controls (n=14) who exhibited an “average” cortisol response to the social separation paradigm in infancy. ER subjects were observed to spend significantly less time in social contact with the unfamiliar monkey, while MR subjects spent significantly more time in social contact with the unfamiliar monkey (ANOVA, p=0.02). There was also a trend for MR subjects to show a shorter latency to approach the unfamiliar monkey (ANOVA, p=0.09). These data suggest that rhesus macaques showing either minimal or extreme responses to early social stress continue to exhibit differential responses to social stress later in life.