Abstract # 4552 Event # 3:

Scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2013 08:30 AM-08:45 AM: (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Symposium


UNRAVELING THE COMPLEXITY OF CALLITRICHINE MATING SYSTEMS BY MERGING INCLUSIVE FITNESS AND SEXUAL SELECTION THEORY: A REVIEW

S. L. Diaz-Munoz
University of California, San Diego, Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, 9500 Gilman Drive, Muir Building 3155, La Jolla, CA 92093-0116, USA
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     Animal mating systems were once viewed as somewhat rigid properties of species. In the last three decades, flexibility in mating systems has been uncovered by employing genetic methods and examining ecological, demographic and behavioral variability between populations and species. Callitrichines are standouts among primates in mating system variability (Goldizen 1988), yet other animal species exhibit strikingly similar dynamics (Mumme et al. 1983; Goldizen et al. 2000; Heinsohn et al. 2007). These species share a cooperative breeding lifestyle and variability in their mating patterns reflects, in large part, individual decisions to maximize fitness by balancing conflict and cooperation (Davies et al. 2005). Thus, I propose that integrating inclusive fitness and sexual selection theory (Rubenstein 2012) can provide a useful framework for understanding Callitrichine mating systems. I review recent genetic and behavioral studies on Callitrichines (with a focus on Saguinus tamarins) in light of this framework and present analyses that can account for mating system variation, including theoretical (Chao 1997), empirical and comparative approaches. Furthermore, I present hypotheses stemming from this perspective on how mating systems relate to differences in male and female behavior, physiology and morphology. I suggest future directions for research and argue that studies of Callitrichines are uniquely positioned to contribute to understanding the relationship between inclusive fitness and sexual selection theory, bringing together these heretofore parallel lines of inquiry in evolutionary biology.