Abstract # 4576 Poster # 92:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


DIFFERENT PERSONALITY TRAITS PREDICT SOCIAL CENTRALITY IN GROOMING NETWORKS OF SMALL AND LARGE SOCIAL GROUPS OF CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

A. L. Heagerty1,2, B. A. Beisner2,3 and B. McCowan2,3
1University of California Davis, Animal Behavior Graduate Group, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3Population Health & Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis
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     Few studies in nonhuman primate personality research have been able to measure the predictive power of personality on future behavior. The present study examined the relationship between personality and social network measures in individuals in both small groups and a large group two years later. Personalities of 50 rhesus macaques in four mixed-sex groups were assessed via trait rating, and grooming interactions were recorded by all occurrences sampling for 38 hours over six months. Subjects were later moved to one large group, where grooming interactions were recorded again for 52 hours over six months. A measure of centrality was calculated for each individual in both social settings using networks created from grooming interactions. Data were analyzed to determine if personality predicted social centrality, using generalized linear models with model selection based on AICc scores. In small social groups, traits associated with sociability, such as nurturant, were predictive of social centrality. Models including nurturant had better AICc scores than models without. However, in the large group, confident individuals had higher social centrality, and models including confidence had better AICc scores than models including nurturant. This suggests that traits predisposing individuals for social connectivity differ by context. Those that achieved high social centrality in small groups by being nurturing were not necessarily able to maximize centrality when encountering increased challenges and social opportunities in the larger group.