Abstract # 4586 Event # 200:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 22, 2013 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: Session 24 (Auditorium) Oral Presentation


DIET AND FORAGING ECOLOGY OF THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED ANDEAN TITI MONKEY (CALLICEBUS OENANTHE) IN NORTHERN PERU

A. M. DeLuycker
Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA
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     Although titi monkeys (genus Callicebus) are majorly frugivorous, differences are seen among species in the non-frugivorous portion of the diet (leaves, seeds or insects), which may be attributed to differences in resource availability due to seasonal variation or habitat type. This study provides the first long-term detailed account of the diet and foraging ecology of a group of Callicebus oenanthe, living in fragmented premontane forest in northern Peru, over nine months. Food type, vegetative type, species, and maturity stage were recorded using instantaneous focal animal sampling. The overall diet consisted mostly of fruits (54%) and insects (22%) with lesser amounts of leaves, tendrils, meristem, flowers, and young seeds. Foraging behavior changed in response to resource availability, as fruit consumption increased with high fruit abundance (rainy season) and insect consumption increased with fruit scarcity (dry season). A minimum of 57 plant species were utilized (30 families); of these, 8 species (9 families) represented >50% of all feeding records. No more than two fruit species made up over half of each month’s fruit dietary proportion. During the dry season, the fruit of semi-parasitic mistletoe (Loranthaceae and Viscaceae) became an important part of the diet. The titis may be able to subsist on plant resources from lianas and those high in secondary compounds, which may not be utilized by other frugivores and are common in disturbed habitats.