Abstract # 106:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 10:15 AM-10:30 AM: Session 12 (Auditorium) Oral Presentation


MALE LIFETIME REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AND OPPORTUNITY OF SELECTION IN RHESUS MACAQUES OF THE FREE-RANGING POPULATION OF CAYO SANTIAGO

C. Dubuc1,2, A. Ruiz-Lambides2,3 and A. Widdig2,4
1New York University, Department of Anthropology, 25 Waverly Place, New York, New York 10003, USA, 2Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 3Cayo Santiago, Caribbean Primate Research Center, University of Puerto Rico, 4Institute of Biology, Faculty of Bioscience, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig
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     In mammals, variance in lifetime reproductive success (LRS) is predicted to be greater for males than females because they are less limited by gamete production and parental investment. While a handful of species characterized by a high degree of polygyny support this prediction, much less is known for sexual promiscuous species. Here, we used 20 years of genetic data to investigate whether male LRS is skewed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), an anthropoid characterized by a high level of sexual promiscuity. We calculated LRS for 211 males and 275 females of the Cayo Santiago population that either died of natural causes or reached senescence, including 86 males and 132 females that reached sexual maturity, and used 3180 potential offspring surviving their first year of life (92.5% of sampling success). We first compared the strength of reproductive skew between males and females (Nonacs' B index), and then assessed the standardized variance of male LRS, a good estimate of the opportunity for selection (I). Male LRS was significantly skewed with about 20% of male subjects never reproducing, and another 35% reproducing more than average. Male skew was more pronounced than female skew, but showed a low standardized variance (I=1.3). These results suggest that there is a opportunity for selection in rhesus macaques, but to a lower degree than in large mammals facing high degree of polygyny.