Abstract # 4601 Poster # 177:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 21 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


POPULATION HISTORY OF ALOUATTA PALLIATA MEXICANA AT THE NORTHERN LIMIT OF ITS DISTRIBUTION: TWO INVASIONS?

L. M. García-Feria1, L. E. Argüello-Sánchez1, J. C. Serio-Silva1 and A. Espinosa de los Monteros2
1Red de Biologia y Conservacion de Vertebrados, Instituto de Ecologia AC, Xalapa, Veracruz 91070, Mexico, 2Red de Biología Evolutiva, Instituto de Ecología AC
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     Studies of the population history of a species allow us to identify, in evolutionary time, periods of stability in its distribution or its expansion, as well as the genetic changes that have occurred that affect the dynamics and genetic structure within the current limits of its distribution. A study of the genetic structure of Alouatta palliata mexicana was done to determine the population history in the northern limit of its distribution in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Bayesian inference and mismatch distribution analyses were used to study sequences of 331 pb of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, obtained from hair samples taken from 46 wild Mexican howler monkeys from twelve locations in four regions in the state of Veracruz. Time of demographic expansion was determined to be 1.8 million years ago (F’s Fu= -3.24), and we detected the possible formation of two lineages with deep genetic divergence (?CT = 0.24, P = 0.025, ?K = 2) that currently exist sympatrically. These lineages possibly were derived from different colonization events in the region of Veracruz by populations that remained isolated during the Pleistocene interglacial periods.