Abstract # 4616 Event # 25:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 11:45 AM-12:00 PM: Session 2 (San Geronimo Ballroom B) Symposium


USE OF THE ORAL CAVITY IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES TO EXAMINE ONTOGENY OF INNATE IMMUNITY AT MUCOSAL SURFACES

J. L. Ebersole, M. J. Novak, L. Orraca, J. Gonzalez-Martinez and O. A. Gonzalez
University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, University of Kentucky, Lexintgon, KY 40536, USA
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     Through the unique availability of a cohort of rhesus monkeys at the CPRC from newborns through aged animals, we conducted a cross-sectional study of M. mulatta from 2-23 years of age by obtaining clinically healthy/periodontitis gingival tissue specimens and using microarray analysis to examine various biologic pathways that occur in the gingival tissues. The presentation will cover 4 areas of interest regarding the gingival biologic milieu. (1) Cellular senescence or replicative senescence cells lose the ability to divide and can secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that disrupt the tissue microenvironment may contribute to disruption of normal cell and tissue homeostasis and functions. (2) Apoptotic processes are important for physiologic renewal of an intact epithelial barrier and contribute some antimicrobial resistance, for both bacteria and viruses that benefits the mucosa including the gingival tissues. (3) Hypoxia (ie. oxygen deprivation) signaling dysregulation commonly occurs during chronic inflammation. (4) Gingival tissues at sites of periodontitis lesions demonstrate features of adaptive immunity including antigen processing and presentation activities to link antigen-presenting cells with the adaptive immune system. These observations regarding characteristics of the gingival milieu in aging animals will help to generate new hypothesis concerning the molecular aspects of maintenance of periodontal health or progression towards tissue destruction. The use of the nonhuman primate model continues to provide a unique system to evaluate immunity at mucosal surfaces.