Abstract # 172:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 21 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


HABITAT- AND TEMPERATURE-RELATED DIFFERENCES IN URINARY INDICES OF HEALTH IN WILD BLACK HOWLER MONKEYS (ALOUATTA PIGRA) IN BALANCÁN, MEXICO

E. L. Zucker1, D. Tejero-Geronimo2 and J. C. Serio-Silva2,3
1Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA, 2Estacion de Investigacion Primatologica y Vida Silvestre, Balancan, Tabasco, Mexico, 3Instituto de Ecologia AC, Xalapa, Mexico
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     To survive and successfully reproduce, individuals of endangered species should be healthy, with health likely mediated by ecological and environmental factors. To assess basic health and possible differences by habitat and temperature, urine samples (N = 430) were collected from monkeys of all age/sex classes during two one-month periods (February/March and April, 2012) and tested in the field with commercially-available dipsticks for 10 parameters. Monkeys were from 24 different groups and subgroups in two habitats (playón and rainforest fragments) at Ranchería Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez. Glucose was rarely present in urine (.07% of samples), protein above trace levels in 34.2%, and ketones, indicative of nutritional stress, present in 11.2%. Urinary pH was approximately 6.5 and specific gravity approximately 1.025. Daily high and low temperatures were significantly greater in April than in February/March (t-tests, p < .05), so parameters with evident variability were tested for differences between the sampling periods and habitats. Ketones were present in significantly more samples in April (test for differences between proportions, p < .02), as were proteins (p < .001), with no significant habitat differences in either measure. Urinary pH differed significantly by habitat and sampling period, with a significant interaction also present (ANOVA; p’s < .005); specific gravity did not vary similarly. This pattern of results suggests few habitat differences in animal health, with differences more related to environmental factors.