Abstract # 65:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


AGES AT LAST BIRTHS AND REPRODUCTIVE SENESCENCE IN A GROUP OF CORRAL-HOUSED RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA)

E. L. Zucker1, C. M. Escabi Ruiz2, E. Maldonado2 and J. Gonzalez-Martinez2
1Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA, 2Caribbean Primate Research Center, Sabana Seca, PR
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     Previous analyses of reproductive data for the females of Group M of the Caribbean Primate Research Center indicated that females of the highest-ranking matriline had greater offspring survival per reproductive year and shorter interbirth intervals (after second births) than females of other matrilines, without having longer lifespans or first infants at younger ages. Here, we report ages at last births and lengths of reproductive senescence for Group M females (N=50) who lived at least 10 years (with known birth and death dates), produced at least one infant, and whose matriline membership was known. Females in this sample lived an average of 16.15 years (sd = 4.46) and gave birth to their last infants at an average age of 14.31 years (sd = 4.49), which was 1.84 years, on average, before their respective deaths (sd = 1.80). Average reproductive life-span, from first to last birth, was 9.61 years (sd = 4.58). There were no significant differences among the three long-standing matrilines in this group for any of these values, although females from the top-ranking matriline had the longest average reproductive span [(age at last birth) – (age at first birth)] and shortest average period of reproductive senescence than did females in other matrilines. The reproductive advantage of females in the highest-ranking matriline was attributable to more rapid reproduction, not earlier or later reproduction during their lifespans.