Abstract # 108:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 10:45 AM-11:00 AM: Session 12 (Auditorium) Oral Presentation


MOTHER’S 5-HTTLPR GENOTYPE X INFANT’S GENOTYPE AFFECT MOTHER-INFANT INTERACTIONS AND OUTCOMES: AGGRESSION, ANXIETY, AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

P. H. O'Connell1, M. T. Bennett1, A. N. Sorenson1, M. L. Schwandt2, C. S. Barr3, S. J. Suomi4 and J. D. Higley1
1Brigham Young University Department of Psychology, Provo, UT 84606, USA, 2Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIH/NIAAA, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA., 3Section of Comparative Behavioral Genomics, LNG, NIH/NIAAA, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA., 4NIH Animal Center, National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, LCE. Poolesville, MD 20837, USA.
line
     Mother-infant interactions are likely influenced by the genes of the infant and the mother, but studies to date have not assessed how the two interact. We longitudinally assessed early mother-infant interactions as modulated by the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) of both the mother and the infant. The two principle variants of the gene are the homozygous Ls (long/short) and heterozygous LL (long/long). The 5-HTTLPR mother/infant gene interaction was hypothesized to regulate infant anxiety and aggression. Subjects consisted of 98 rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) infants. Data were collected the first six months using two 300 second sessions each week by trained observers with reliability r >.80. Behaviors were reduced to general categories using factor analysis, and factor scores were analyzed using a between groups, two factor, univariate analysis of variance with genotype of the mother and infant constituting the independent variables. There were significant infant genotype by mother genotype interactions for distress vocalizations [f(1/98) 3.74, p<0.05], and with rearing controlled, for freezing [f(2/83) 5.02, p<0.01]. With mother’s rearing controlled, there was also a significant gene x gene interaction for social grooming [f(2/83) 5.022, p<0.01]. Significant infant genotype main effects were seen for the frequency in which the infants received aggression [f(2/83) 6.87 p<0.01], the Ls infants being more aggressed, and contact aggression was found only in infants of whose genotype matched that of their mothers’.