Abstract # 210:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 22, 2013 11:30 AM-12:00 PM: Session 25 (San Geronimo Ballroom C) Oral Presentation


INTRINSIC AND ENTRAINED CIRCADIAN PATTERNS OF FOOD INTAKE IN MACACA MULATTA: EFFECTS OF AGE AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS.

I. Zhdanova1,2, J. Gonzalez2 and K. Masuda1,2
1Boston University, 72 E.Concord Av.R-913, Boston, MA 02118, USA, 2Caribbean Primate Research Center
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     The circadian clock disruption, leading to acute or chronic misalignment of internal processes, can predispose to chronic disease. Little is known about intrinsic circadian patterns of food intake as defined by individual circadian clock and metabolic mechanisms, how they change with age and whether a discrepancy between intrinsic and entrained patterns is a risk factor for metabolic disorders, including obesity and diabetes. The critical advantages of a diurnal NHP model in addressing these translational research questions is in between-species similarities in the temporal alignment of the clock mechanisms and downstream physiological and behavioral processes, consolidated nighttime sleep and, under controlled conditions, distinct individual intrinsic and entrained patterns of self-feeding. The studies were conducted at the Primate Circadian Research Laboratory (PCRL, at BU and CPRC) through continuous monitoring of the circadian rhythms of activity, food intake and cognitive performance in 27 young (5-10 years) and 9 aged (18-28 years) Macaca mulatta of both genders. A variety of stable individual intrinsic food intake patterns, and their typical age-dependent modifications were documented, including significant (p<0.05) changes in the distribution, frequency and duration of food bouts. These data provides a background for in-depth investigation into the role of intrinsic circadian patterns of food intake and their potential role in metabolic conditions.