Abstract # 4632 Poster # 82:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 20, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 9 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


EARLY REARING CONDITIONS AFFECT MONOAMINE METABOLITE LEVELS DURING PERIODS OF SOCIAL SEPARATION STRESS: A NONHUMAN PRIMATE MODEL USING SOCIAL SEPARATION (MACACA MULATTA)

A. N. Sorenson1, D. J. Garcia1, P. J. Gartman1, M. L. Schwandt 2, C. S. Barr3, S. J. Suomi4 and J. D. Higley1
1Brigham Young University , Department of Psychology , Provo , Utah 84602, USA, 2Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIH/NIAAA, 3Section of Comparative Behavioral Genomics, LNG, NIH/NIAAA, 4NIH Animal Center, National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, LCE
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     This study uses structural equation modeling to analyze the effect of rearing, sex, environment and stress on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite concentrations in rhesus macaque infants reared by their biological mother (MR, n=98), or without adults in peer groups (PR, n=81). We hypothesized that parental absence would diminish central monoamine functioning as measured by CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations. MR infants were separated from their mother and the PR infants were separated from their peers for four sequential, 4-day separations, each followed by a 3-day reunion. At the end of each social separation subjects were anesthetized using ketamine and a CSF sample was obtained from the cisterna magna. Samples were assayed for serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolite levels (5-HIAA, HVA, and MHPG, respectively). Individual latent growth curve models for each monoamine metabolite show that the early rearing condition of infants has a significant impact on monoamine metabolite levels. All three monoamine metabolites showed a significant difference at intercept based on rearing (p<0.001), with PR subjects possessing lower monoamine metabolites. Both 5-HIAA and MHPG showed significant decreases across separations for both MR and PR infants (p<0.02). Sex modulated HVA and 5-HIAA rearing differences, and MHPG was modulated by separation condition (alone or home cage). This research indicates that early parental absence attenuates the functioning of the monoamines, particularly during periods of chronic stress.