Abstract # 139:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 04:45 PM-05:00 PM: Session 19 (Auditorium) Oral Presentation


HABITAT USE AND DIET SELECTION IN RELATION TO FEMALE MOOR MACAQUE (MACACA MAURA) REPRODUCTIVE STATE

C. Sagnotti1,2, A. Achmad1, N. P. Oka1, E. P. Riley3, I. Kamaruddin4 and M. Carosi2,5
1Department of Forestry, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia, Makassar, Sulawesi Selatan, Indonesia, 2Department of Biology, Tor Vergata University, Italy, 3Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University, USA, 4Bantimurung-Bulusaraung National Park, Indonesia, 5Department of Science, Roma Tre University, Italy
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     We investigated whether individual variability in habitat use and diet selection could partly be explained by energetic demands and nutritional goals driven by the female reproductive state in free-ranging female moor macaques (Macaca maura). In particular, the swelling of the anogenital area during the peri-ovulatory phase (PO) may represent a particularly high-energy period. We used scan sampling to collect behavioral data (11 females,1025 scan samples) 6 days/week (August 2010-February 2011) in Bantimurung-Bulusaraung National Park, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The females’ dietary repertoire comprises 74 plant and fungi species. Fruit represents the largest portion of the diet (82%), with fig fruits being the most common (30%). In terms of different items consumed (plants, fungi, insects), PO females showed greater dietary diversity (diversity index H’=0.82) than females in other reproductive states (H’=0.53-0.73). Female reproductive state (RS) and forest strata (FS) have a significant interactive effect on female activity budgets (two-way Permanova, RS, df=3, F=1.07, p=0.052; FS, df=3, F=6.8, p=0.0001; interaction between RS and FS, df=9, F=-1.7, p=0.007) with PO females preferring higher strata where foraging and feeding represent their main activity. These results support the hypothesis that the PO phase may represent an energetically demanding phase, possibly affecting the outcome of conception. Moreover, by identifying the high-quality foods females seek out during critical reproductive phases, our work can inform efforts to protect high-quality habitat for this endangered primate