Abstract # 185:

Scheduled for Friday, June 21, 2013 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 21 (SG Foyer ABC) Poster Presentation


CLARENCE R. CARPENTER AND THE FOUNDATION OF FIELD COGNITIVE RESEARCH IN PRIMATOLOGY

B. Urbani
Centro de Antropologia, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificias, Caracas 1061-A, Venezuela
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     This work reconstructs the research of Clarence R. Carpenter and its implications in the development of cognitive field Primatology. Archival and original notes of Carpenter such as personal cards and field notebooks were consulted, as well as published material. First, this paper reviews the ideas of memory and territoriality from its origins through the 1920s and 1930s, and their impact on the earliest field work of Carpenter, and latter explores how these ideas were fundamental in stimulating a novel point of view in the conceptualization of the study of primate behavior. The first and original spatio-temporal perspective presented by C. R. Carpenter integrates, in a time framework, discreet spatial units (e.g. the loci) within a larger spatial scale (the network). This theoretical view led to a novel methodology for conducting fieldwork, primarily on the study of howler monkeys, gibbons, and macaques. This represents a re-examination of the origins of field primatology as a bioanthropological discipline after the end of the World War II. The new Carpenter’s perspective on primate spatial cognition impacted the field of Primatology especially after the 1980s.