Abstract # 62:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


SOCIAL SUBORDINATION, 5-HT TRANSPORTER GENE POLYMORPHISMS, AND BONE MASS AMONG OVARIECTOMIZED, SOCIALLY-HOUSED FEMALE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

A. Mummert1,2, M. Sanchez1,2, Z. Johnson1,2 and M. E. Wilson1,2
1Emory University, 207 Anthropology Building, 1557 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA, 2Yerkes National Primate Research Center
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     Alterations to the serotonergic system mechanistically explain epidemiological associations between depression and osteoporosis through stress-induced disruption of serotonin (5-HT) transporter activity in bone cells. 5-HT transporter gene polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR) may mediate these effects, with the short (s) allele being less transcriptionally active and reducing bone mass accrual. Previous research documents a low bone mass phenotype among subordinate Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), leading us to test the hypothesis that subordination and the s allele interact to result in diminished accumulation of bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) and bone mineral content (BMC; g) during mid-adulthood. Subjects were 33 ovariectomized, adult female Rhesus macaques at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center who were previously genotyped. Whole body and trunk BMD and BMC were assessed in 2009 and 2011 using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dominant and subordinate rank were determined by observations of agnostic behavior. Overall, the interaction between rank and 5-HTTPLR polymorphism did not have a statistically significant effect on whole body BMD accumulation [Mixed ANOVA, F(1, 29)= 1.484, p=0.233, partial ?2=0.049]. There was, however, a significant main effect of time [F(1, 29)= 9.638, p=0.004, partial ?2=0.249], with a mean increase of 0.032 g/cm2 over the 2 year study period. Results were similar for the trunk and BMC. These results indicate that 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms may not interact with subordination to influence mid-adult skeletal health.