Abstract # 5816 Event # 117:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 03:00 PM-03:15 PM: Session 19 (Decatur A) Oral Presentation


PREDATION RATE AND FUTURE REPRODUCTIVE POTENTIAL EXPLAIN HOME RANGE SIZE IN GOLDEN LION TAMARINS

S. J. Hankerson1,2 and J. M. Dietz2,3
1University of St. Thomas, Department of Psychology, St. Paul, MN 55105, USA, 2University of Maryland, College Park, 3Save the Golden Lion Tamarin
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     Recent research indicates that as group size increases, groups travel further and occupy larger home ranges in order to meet basic energetic needs for survival and reproduction. We used 19 years of demographic and ranging data for golden lion tamarins, Leontopithecus rosalia, to examine the influences of group and population demography on space use. Significant variation in rates of predation during the study allowed us to test predation’s influence on these processes. Predation changed group composition, group size, and population density. These predation-mediated changes explained 71% of variation in home range size. Increased predation decreased lion tamarin home ranges through the effects of smaller group sizes with fewer adult natal males and reproductive females in groups. The decreased ranging that resulted from group size and composition changes was offset somewhat by lower population density during high predation, i.e. reduced pressure from neighbors limited the home range reduction. We also found that groups with high future reproductive potential, i.e. multiple breeding females, increased their home range size. This effect was independent of group size. We propose a new hypothesis, that taxa with high rates of reproduction, such as lion tamarins, will increase home range size to accommodate future reproduction rather than current energy needs. No or low production of infants and litters on the smallest lion tamarin ranges in our study supports this new hypothesis.