Abstract # 163:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


BEYOND PEANUT BUTTER: REFINEMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF THE FORAGING AND ORAL DOSING PLAN FOR CLINICAL AND ENRICHMENT PURPOSES

M. C. Carey1,2,3,4, R. J. Mistretta1,2,3,4, W. L. Wagner1,3, J. M. Erwin5, C. Guevara1,2,3,4, Z. Pippin3 and A. Lozano1,3
1BIOQUAL, Inc. , Department of Primate Psychology, Rockville, MD 20852-1749, USA, 2BIOQUAL Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD, 3BIOQUAL Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD, 4BIOQUAL Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Piccard Drive, Rockville, MD, 5Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, DC
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     Research protocols, clinical procedures, and nutritional supplementation may require the use of repeated dosing methods for the delivery of medications. While a variety of routes are available, oral dosing is a non-invasive option which can minimize stress and encourage animals’ voluntary cooperation with treatments. Peanut butter is a staple of oral treatments and enrichment programs, but frequent and consistent use of one particular item can result in habituation to (and refusal of) treatments as well as possible nutritional imbalances. To meet these challenges we have developed a Nonhuman Primate Dosing Plan which has successfully been used with Rhesus (Macaca mulatta), Cynomologous (Macaca fasicularis), and Pigtail (Macaca nemistrina) Macaques. All NHPs receive non-dosed control cups as weekly enrichment treats regardless of protocol or clinical need. Control cups are distributed in the mornings prior to biscuit feeding and the same forage formula is never used consecutively. Technical staff observes each cup’s reception notes acceptance or refusal. Because every forage formula is assessed prior to study requirements, we are able to acclimate individuals to the dosing procedure, identify individual/species food preferences, ensure nutritional balance, and determine compatible food-medication combinations. The Plan was supported when a currently ongoing protocol required rhesus to receive 2 treatments/day (initial n= 80 doses). Preliminary results show treatment acceptance is 95% successful, and demonstrates the ease of treatment application under an established Dosing Plan.