Abstract # 5832 Event # 137:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: Session 21 (Mary Gay) Oral Presentation


EFFECT OF REWARD TYPE ON REINFORCED LEARNING BEHAVIOR IN LABORATORY-HOUSED COPPERY TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

S. M. Freeman1, N. Rebout2 and K. L. Bales1
1University of California-Davis, California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Agrocampus Ouest, Rennes, France
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     We used a two-object discrimination task to test the efficacy of two types of reward on reinforcement learning in socially monogamous titi monkeys. We hypothesized that titi monkeys would perform more accurately for a social reward (their pair-mate) than for a food reward (banana). Eleven adult titi monkeys (7 males) were tested for both types of reward, with the colors (black, gray, or white) and shapes (circle, square, or triangle) of the objects counterbalanced across subjects. Trials ended when the subject touched the reinforced shape (S+) or after 5 minutes. A correct trial was one when the subject touched S+ first. Subjects switched to the other reward after meeting criteria for success (10 correct trials out of 12) or after 30 trials passed. We analyzed the data using logistic regression. There was no effect of testing order on any outcomes. Subjects took longer to approach the shapes for the social reward (F=12.68, p=0.002), although the latencies to touch either shape after approaching were not different between groups. With the social reward, subjects balked more often (F=9.291, p=0.006) and had a fewer correct trials (F=6.887, p=0.015). Significantly fewer subjects met criteria of success with the social reward (X2=4.2177, p= 0.040). Our hypothesis that this socially monogamous species would perform better for a social reward was not supported. Funding: HD053555; NIH OD P51OD011107; the Good Nature Institute.