Abstract # 138:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 04:00 PM-04:15 PM: Session 21 (Mary Gay) Oral Presentation


EVALUATING AND APPRECIATING BEHAVIORAL TRAINING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN AFRICAN GREEN MONKEYS (CHLOROCEBUS AETHIOPS SABAEUS) AND CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES (MACACA FASCICULARIS)

J. Makar2, L. R. Hamilton1 and T. M. Myers1
1United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Neurobehavioral Toxicology Branch, Analytical Toxicology Division, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010, USA, 2United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense
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     Behavioral analysis in nonhuman primates remains an indispensable tool for examining a variety of human health issues. While macaque species are abundantly used in the laboratory, a proposed suitable substitute is the African green monkey. This species is readily available at a lower cost and may offer safety benefits because of its smaller adult size, more docile temperament, and not being a Macacine herpesvirus 1 carrier. Although these animals may be adequate alternatives there are apparent differences, specifically in behavioral training, to be considered when selecting an appropriate animal model. We compared African green monkey and cynomolgus macaque performance in pole and collar restraint chair training, target training, and a computerized memory task (DMTS). The data discussed compares number of sessions necessary to reach acceptable levels of accuracy or completion, intermediate steps needed, and overall technique/strategy. Chair training was divided into ten steps, each rated on a 5 point scale for proficiency, measured as consistent scoring of 4 or better. Target training was recorded in narrative form for daily sessions (~10 min) evaluating number of sessions to reach three days of appropriate response. DMTS data was evaluated for reaching success on terminal parameters, considered to be two days at 85% accuracy or better. Tests of means revealed that African green monkeys required considerably more intermediate steps and training sessions than did macaques.