Abstract # 5843 Event # 204:

Scheduled for Monday, September 15, 2014 01:00 PM-01:15 PM: Session 28 (Henry Oliver F) Oral Presentation


DEVELOPMENT OF A TOUCHSCREEN TESTING APPARATUS TO ASSESS RECURRENT PERSEVERATION IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

D. H. Gottlieb, S. W. Gonzales, K. A. Grant, L. Houser and K. Coleman
Oregon National Primate Research Center, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR 97006, USA
line
     Stereotypic behaviors, such as repetitive pacing, can have several potentially overlapping causes, including frustration, boredom, and stress. Further, some stereotypic behaviors may be caused by recurrent perseveration, the inappropriate repetition of previous responses or movements due to dysfunction of the basal ganglia motor system. Knowing which stereotypic behaviors are due to perseveration would help management and remediation of the behaviors. The goal of this project was to develop a method to assess recurrent perseveration in rhesus macaques. We designed a portable touchscreen testing apparatus that allowed us to train animals in their home cage to perform a modified “Two-Choice Gambling Task,” a task commonly used to measure recurrent perseveration in human and non-human animals. In this test, animals are randomly rewarded for touching one of two squares on a screen, with rewards diminishing when the same square is repeatedly touched. To date, we have used this methodology to test perseveration with two adult female macaques, one that exhibited stereotypic behaviors and one that did not. Subjects performed the task for 375 trials over five days. Using 3rd order Markov chain analysis, we found that the stereotypic individual displayed responses consistent with recurrent perseveration, while the non-stereotypic individual’s responses were not significantly perseverative [alpha = 0.05]. Thus, this test may be an effective, non-invasive tool to measure basal ganglia dysfunction in captive primates.