Abstract # 5855 Poster # 55:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


TORPOR IN A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED PRIMATE: CLIMATE EFFECTS ON JAVAN SLOW LORIS [NYCTICEBUS JAVANICUS] BEHAVIOR

K. D. Reinhardt1,2, D. Spaan1,2, I. Wirdateti3 and K. A. Nekaris1,2,4
1Oxford Brookes University, Kathleen Reinhardt, Department of Social Sciences and Law, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP, United Kingdom, 2The Little Fireface Project, 3Research Centre for Biology-LIPI, 4The Nocturnal Primate Research Group
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     Listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Redlist and thrice included in the Top 25 Most Endangered Primates, the Javan slow loris [Nycticebus javanicus] finds itself increasingly restricted to various environmental constraints. Increased agriculture and fragmented forest area force this endemic species to adapt to habitat restrictions of increased elevation with lower temperatures - a process characterizing much of the remaining geographic range of seven other loris species, historically found in lowland forest area. Lorises of unknown geographic origin are currently being reintroduced to high altitude forested areas with no knowledge of their adaptive abilities, a behavioral response virtually unknown. Examining the adaptive behavior of N. javanicus, this study was conducted on wild lorises in the agroforests of Cipiganti, Garut District, West Java, Indonesia. Three loris pairs with home ranges at different altitudes [800m, 1000m, 1200m] were examined for 3 months through use of activity and skin temperature loggers to determine effects of climate and altitude on 24-hour activity budgets; both ambient and skin temperature loggers to determine effects of climate on thermoregulation (torpor use); vegetation plots to determine effects of anthropogenic disturbance on activity and home range use. By use of general linear regression, we examined presence of a correlation between torpor use and habitat structure as well as climatic factors. We present a strategy for conservation of habitat in relation to these results.