Abstract # 5857 Event # 139:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 04:15 PM-04:30 PM: Session 21 (Mary Gay) Oral Presentation


FEMALE OLIVE BABOONS (PAPIO ANUBIS) DISRUPT THE MATING ACTIVITIES OF OTHER FEMALES: EVIDENCE FOR FEMALE-FEMALE COMPETITION?

J. Walz and D. M. Kitchen
The Ohio State University, 4034 Smith Laboratory, 174 W. 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
line
     Within a group of olive baboons (Papio anubis), multiple females are reproductively competent at any given time, and thus may directly compete for the attention of high-quality males. We examined the impact of female-female aggression on mating opportunities in a wild population of baboons at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. From April-December 2012, we recorded agonistic interactions between focal females (n = 13) and all adult individuals during consortships with adult males (n = 18). We used approach-retreat interactions to determine dominance ranks. Generalized linear mixed models were employed to test for an effect of rank and age of both members of the consort on the rates of aggression received from and directed towards mate-guarded females by other females. We found a positive relationship between aggression received by mate-guarded females and the rank of the mate-guarding male (n = 116, df = 1, F = 6.052, p = 0.024). However, there was no effect of the consorting male’s rank and the rate of aggression directed at other females by the consorting female. These data demonstrate that female-female competition may impact a female’s ability to copulate with potentially high-quality partners. Furthermore, a lack of relationship between rates of received and directed aggression and female rank or age indicates that, regardless of their social status, female olive baboons can attempt to disrupt the mating probabilities of female competitors.